UF: “Writing the Digital Humanities” (12/8/2011)

The “Writing the Digital Humanities” a conference is by graduate students in Laurie Gries’s current seminar and will be held 12/8/2011 from 1-6pm in Pugh Hall 210.

Details: The Digital Humanities is an emergent field of study currently being “written” by scholars across the humanities. This conference highlights innovative scholarship being produced by graduate students in the Department of English, who are working at the intersections of computing and media studies, children’s literature, writing studies, queer studies, creative writing, and ecocritism. All panel presentations will take place in Pugh Hall 210.

  • 1 PM, Opening remarks by Laurie Gries
  • 1:15 PM, Panel A, “Interfaced Materialities.” Caroline Stone, Sean Printz, and Joan Shaffer.
  • 2:25 PM, Panel B, “Embedded Agents.” Kyle Bohunicky, Casey Wilson, and Melissa Bianchi.
  • 4:00 PM, Panel C, “Envisioning Practice: Digital Media, Pedagogy, and the Creative Process.” Rebecca Evanhoe, John Tinnell,and Sam Hamilton.
  • 5:10 PM, Panel D, “You Can’t Go Home Again: Queered Utopias in Digital Humanities.” Jordan Youngblood and Joseph Weakland.
Details added on 12/8/2011:

Writing the Digital Humanities Conference, 2011
Thursday, December 8, 2011
Pugh Hall 210

The Digital Humanities is an emergent field of study currently being “written” by scholars across the humanities. This conference highlights innovative scholarship being produced by graduate students in the Department of English, who are working at the intersections of computing and media studies, children’s literature, writing studies, queer studies, creative writing, and ecocritism.

Opening Remarks                                                                                                                       1:00pm – 1:10pm
Laurie Gries

Panel A                                                                                                                                        1:15pm – 2:15pm
Interfaced Materialities
Caroline Stone, Sean Printz, and Joan Shaffer
This panel seeks to open a space to ask what studies of materiality have to offer the digital humanities. This panel presents different approaches for considering the materiality of digital interfaces by addressing the design and functionality of eBooks, the virtual artifacts of game worlds, and artistic practices that reveal material effects of the upgrade path.

Panel B                                                                                                                                                  2:25pm – 3:25pm
Embedded Agents
Kyle Bohunicky, Casey Wilson, and Melissa Bianchi
Presentations in this panel meet at the crossroads of circulation and new media studies to engage the agency that the unforeseen and the invisible have in our everyday lives. By studying X-ray images in video games, tracing community practices that materialize via Youtube, and following glitches that thrive on new frontiers of electronic media ecosystems, this panel opens up questions for visual rhetorics, young adult literature, and media ecology.

Break               3:30pm– 4:00pm

Panel D                                                                                                                                           4:00pm – 5:00pm
Envisioning Practice: Digital Media, Pedagogy, & the Creative Process
Rebecca Evanhoe, John Tinnell, Sam Hamilton
As defined by scholar Kathleen Blake Yancey, “Envisionment is the ability to use a given technology for a purpose other than its intended purpose.” Unintended innovations emerge from consumer needs and have potential to become valuable and practical tools for composing, teaching, and forming educational communities. To demonstrate such potential, each panelist will present his or her own “experiment” in repurposing new media for pedagogical and creative outcomes.

Panel D                                                                                                                                            5:10pm – 6:00pm
You Can’t Go Home Again: Queered Utopias in Digital Humanities
Jordan Youngblood, Joseph Weakland
This panel responds to the claim that the “Digital Humanities has a utopian core shaped by its genealogical descent from the counterculture-cyberculture intertwinglings of the 60s and 70s.” This panel combines ecological criticism, queer theory, and game theory to disrupt and analyze this “utopian core” by analyzing digital bodies and representations of nature in contemporary video games and films.